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Nov Advocate 2017

THE ADVOCATE 887 VOL. 75 PART 6 NOVEMBER 2017 their relationship with the law, noting for example the over-representation of Indigenous people among criminal and social justice cases. He challenged students to read about and understand the Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (“TRC”) as a way to participate in addressing these disparities. “I challenge you to visit the TRC website, listen to some of the stories and gain a sense of appreciation and awareness. We will learn and understand what it means to the law and to a better path forward,” Judge Crabtree stated. He also encouraged students to take part in the law school’s annual tour of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School and to observe First Nations Court (Kamloops hosts one of the growing number of First Nations Courts in the province). Judge Crabtree closed his comments with a look to the future of the legal system and enhancing access to justice. “The profession is poised for real systemic change. We need to be looking at how we can move forward in a way that is not too expensive or complex and that is quicker,” he said. Other important guests speaking during the week included Law Society equity ombudsperson Anne Chopra, TRU wellness coordinator Chelsea Corsi, TRU sexual violence prevention manager Amber Huva and Lawyers Assistance Program executive director Derek LaCroix, Q.C. NEW STAFF Our faculty of law has welcomed a number of key staff over recent months. Assistant Professor Andrew Pilliar, B.Sc. (Hons.) (Queen’s), J.D. (Toronto), LL.M. (UBC), Ph.D. candidate (UBC), joined the law school effective July 1. His doctoral research examines the structure of the market for personal legal services and efforts to improve access to justice sustainably. His prior LL.M. research explored the twin problems of access to civil justice and career dissatisfaction among lawyers, suggesting an innovative practice model to alleviate both. Before returning to graduate studies, Andrew clerked at the B.C. Supreme Court and practised in the litigation and insolvency fields at a national law firm and at a Vancouver boutique. In addition to his current research Andrew has investigated pro bono work patterns among B.C. lawyers, the business/profession dichotomy in law and the contours of graduate legal education in Canada. He is also a founder of the Access to Justice Research Network. His interest in access to justice extends both to how people find and obtain legal services, and to how legal service providers can deliver services in more accessible ways. His articles have appeared in the Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice and the Journal of Law & Equality, and his TEDx talk on access to justice has


Nov Advocate 2017
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