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Nov Advocate 2017

876 THE ADVOCATE VOL. 75 PART 6 NOVEMBER 2017 Royal Society recently created a new entity, the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists, to recognize “the emerging generation of Canadian intellectual leadership”. Dr. Val Napoleon has just been elected a member of that college. Professors Borrows and Webber are also fellows of the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation. The Trudeau Foundation names four or five fellows each year across all the disciplines of the humanities and social sciences in Canada, supporting them to do research at the highest level. Yet a third member of the faculty was also named a Trudeau Fellow: Professor James Tully (indeed, he was a member of the inaugural group of fellows in 2003). To have three Trudeau Fellows in a single academic unit is very rare. The Trudeau Foundation also provides the best-funded and most prestigious graduate scholarships in Canada—only 15 across all disciplines each year. Here too UVic Law has been very successful, producing (until recently) four Trudeau Scholars: Dawnis Kennedy (now teaching at Algoma University and Shingwauk Kinoomaage Gamig), Andrée Boisselle (now teaching at Osgoode Hall), Johnny Mack (now teaching at UBC) and Aaron Mills (now teaching at McGill). Ryan Beaton is the faculty’s fifth Trudeau Scholar. In this article we introduce you to the work of Val Napoleon and Ryan Beaton. DR. VAL NAPOLEON, LAW FOUNDATION CHAIR OF ABORIGINAL JUSTICE AND GOVERNANCE Val Napoleon is one of Canada’s most influential Indigenous scholars. She has held the Law Foundation Chair of Aboriginal Justice and Governance since 2012. She also is the founder of UVic Law’s Indigenous Law Research Unit (“ILRU”), the only dedicated unit of its kind in the country, which works closely with Indigenous peoples to recover and develop their own legal traditions, identifying resources from within those traditions to address the challenges they face. Napoleon is of Dunneza, Cree and Saulteau heritage and a member of the Saulteau First Nation in northeastern B.C. She worked as a community activist and consultant in northwestern B.C. for over 25 years, specializing in health, education and justice issues. She served for a time on the Coast Mountain School Board, becoming its chair. She was adopted into the Gitanyow (Gitksan) House of Luuxhon, Ganeda (Frog) clan. She came to law school as a grandmother. She was a very impressive student, obtaining her LL.B. in 2001. She went on to do graduate work in law, f irst through an ad hoc interdisciplinary program and then, in 2004,


Nov Advocate 2017
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