Page 47

Nov Advocate 2017

THE ADVOCATE 845 THE WINE COLUMN By Michael Welsh* * Michael Welsh has a litigation and ADR practice in the South Okanagan. Among his passions is good wine, the consumption of which he legitimizes by BC VQA wine judging for the British Columbia Wine Authority and as the regular wine columnist for the Advocate. VOL. 75 PART 6 NOVEMBER 2017 Before I met you, the sun was like a yellow grape. —Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren in Orange Is the New Black ORANGE IS THE NEW RED You may think wine comes in three colours—red, white and pink (rosé). Well not any more—in fact, not for the last couple of millennia. Welcome back to the mainstream “orange wine”. What is orange wine? Let me be clear from the start: it is not wine from oranges. In fact no oranges are ever harmed in the making of this wine. Instead, it is wine from white grapes that are handled as if they were red grapes, being crushed and then fermented on their skins. Also known as “amber wine” or “skin-fermented white wine”, it takes on a golden or orange hue and gains tannic characteristics from the skins and pits (and sometimes stems). Another term for it is Ramato, which means “auburn” in Italian and typically refers to Italian Pinot Grigio made in an orange-wine style. The deep orange colour actually comes from the lignin in the grape seeds. (Lignin, for the biology buffs, is a class of complex organic polymers that form important structural materials in the support tissues of vascular plants, most notably lending rigidity to cell walls in bark, wood, straw, seeds and the like.)


Nov Advocate 2017
To see the actual publication please follow the link above