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Nov Advocate 2017

THE ADVOCATE 957 VOL. 75 PART 6 NOVEMBER 2017 Jacqueline E. de Aguayo was appointed a member and acting chair of the Employment Standards Tribunal and as acting chair of the Labour Relations Board. Both appointments are for a term of six months. A legal challenge has been launched in the U.K. in an attempt to have the government’s deal with the Democratic Unionist Party declared illegal. It is contended that the pact breaches the Good Friday Agreement as well as the Bribery Act. “It takes at least two to tango for conspiracy purposes” is a principle repeatedly cited by U.S. courts. The “two-to-tango” principle has been applied in other contexts as well. For example, “contracting, like dancing the tango, takes two; one party’s belief that there was an agreement isn’t enough”: Equatorial Marine Fuel Management Pte Ltd. v. MISC Berhad, 591 F.3d 1208 (U.S. App. 9th Cir., 2010). Would you like to live in the Falkland Islands, population about 3,000 humans and countless sheep? The government is advertising for a head of legal services. Salary up to £86,000, relocation expenses, low income tax and a two- or three-year appointment, with the opportunity to extend it depending on performance. If interested email <recruitment@sec. gov.fk>. Applicants, however, should remember that the islands are susceptible to invasion by Argentina, when that country has nothing else to worry about or wishes a domestic distraction. The National Library of Australia notes of that country’s unofficial anthem: “For most people, the words of ‘Waltzing Matilda’ embody the free spirit, resourcefulness and defiance of authority associated with the Australian national character. The melody is memorable and spirited.” Allen M. Linden, B.A., LL.B., LL.M., J.S.D., Q.C., O.O.C., died in August 2017. Best known as the author of Canadian Tort Law (now in its 10th edition), he has been described as the dean of tort law in Canada. He earned a master’s degree and a doctorate from the University of California at Berkeley. After a brief stint in private practice, he taught at Osgoode Hall from 1961 until 1978, when he was appointed to the Supreme Court of Ontario. Unhappy with the other judges’ attitude to him as an academic interloper, he resigned in 1983 to become the president of the Law Reform Commission of Canada. He became a judge of the Federal Court in 1990, where, since he was bilingual, he could conduct cases in both languages. But he is best known as the leader of the successful campaign and lawsuit on behalf of the thalidomide victims.


Nov Advocate 2017
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