Page 156

Nov Advocate 2017

954 THE ADVOCATE VOL. 75 PART 6 NOVEMBER 2017 “Last Tango in Paris” is a film which has evoked both high praise and strong criticism. But the issue is not whether it is a good film or a bad film, but rather whether it is obscene under the Criminal Code. That issue must be determined according to contemporary community standards in Canada … Relevant to that determination are many factors. One is the testimony of the experts, to be judicially assessed and weighed. Another is the circumstance that the film is adult fare only, as it has been given the classification ‘Restricted Adult’, thereby becoming unavailable to persons under 18 years of age. A third is the fact that the film is being shown in New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia, in all of which Provinces it was given clearance by censor boards who made no deletions in it. (The film is of course being shown in many other countries in the world as well.) The record does not disclose a single Province that has banned “Last Tango”. I am loath to believe that Manitobans are less tolerant, less sophisticated, or more in need of protective shelter than other Canadians. Having regard to all these factors I am of the view that the film in question is not obscene. The Grammarian: advice to a confused profession, from one who knows about these things. Homophones, Homonyms and Homographs. Homophones: words that sound alike, but have different meanings; e.g., roll, as a noun, is a portion of bread or a list of names in a group (Lord Denning was Master of the Rolls); and role, which refers to a part in a play or a part that a person has in some activity or situation. Other examples are real and reel, broach and brooch, know and no, and puny and puisne. Homonyms: words that are the same as another in sound and spelling, but which have two or more meanings; e.g., capital, a punishment and a chief city. Homographs: words which are spelled the same but have different meanings; e.g., bear, to carry but also the animal; moped, the past tense of mope and a small motorcycle. According to the U.K. Independent in 2003, “a solicitor who claimed he was too busy Cossack dancing to have stolen £1m from dead and injured clients was jailed for eight years”, after apparently claiming that “staff at his firm had embezzled the cash while he was working to secure appearances with Kylie Minogue and Ali G for his international dance troupe. The former solicitor, of Huntingdon Drive, Nottingham, claimed his devotion to dancing had begun at the age of four and that he had combined his legal duties with nightly appearances on stage.”


Nov Advocate 2017
To see the actual publication please follow the link above