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934 THE ADVOCATE of advice that are meant to be followed. Perhaps the separate literary treatments given to recommendations and advice, respectively, by Hemingway that are set out in the quotations above might have better conveyed Owen-Flood J.’s point in College of Physicians and Surgeons than did the more obscure language he adapted from Beckett’s Waiting for Godot.2 But then, who among us who remember him fondly for, inter alia, his resolutely Irish wit, could imagine Owen- Flood J. ever referring—in life, much less in one of his judgments— to the “paper on the seat”? (Less still to spurious advice that one ought “never go to law”.) Utterly unthinkable! T.S. Woods, P.C.J. Vancouver ENDNOTES VOL. 75 PART 6 NOVEMBER 2017 in “A Pursuit Race” comes at a time in the short story when Mr. Campbell is, himself, heavily intoxicated and drug sick. Mr. Turner is remonstrating with Mr. Campbell about the wrongheaded way he has gone about trying to conquer his problems with depression and alcohol abuse by turning to drugs. Mr. Campbell’s suggestion, in response, that Mr. Turner have a drink himself is a cheeky one. But it is a mere suggestion, made in jest, and nothing more; there is no real expectation that it will be acted upon. The context leaves the writer in no doubt that the suggestion falls far short of crossing over the boundary that divides recommendations from advice. By contrast, the clear cautions that appear in Hemingway’s poem “Advice to a Son” are, as the title of the poem makes plain, admonitory words of guidance and direction given by a father to his son—that is, stern words of advice from a man of considerable age, experience and worldliness to one who is younger, less experienced and naïve. One can readily see that they are words 1. May his soul be at God’s right hand. 2. This, however, can be the only situation imaginable in which recourse to the arid and machine-like writings of Ernest Hemingway would be preferable to recourse to the rich and verdant pastures of endlessly intriguing and challenging prose and poetry that Samuel Beckett has left us. t t t t t


Nov Advocate 2017
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