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May Advocate 2017

412 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE Glenn has a favourite story to explain what it was like in those early days. In the spring of 1978 a student named Tony Palmer (who subsequently became a Provincial Court judge and is now retired) showed up for his first day at the Law Centre and on his desk was a pile of about 30 files. At four o’clock that same afternoon he went into Glenn’s office and said, “You know, it looks to me like maybe we have a trial tomorrow.” He was right— it was a Small Claims trial. This exchange revealed a glaring need to prepare students for the work they would be doing. That very first clinical term was in the spring of 1977. The clinic was located in Bastion Square in the Law Chambers Building. In early 1978 the Legal Aid Society office in Victoria joined the Law Centre clinical program and together moved to 510 Fort Street until 1980. At that point the office moved to 1221 Broad Street where it remained, for the most part, for the next 20 years. Glenn left Victoria in 1982 to study for his LL.M. in public international law at the London School of Economics, and returned as director of the clinic until 1985. Between 1985 and 1992 John Orr was the clinical director; however Glenn remained at the Law Centre mentoring students and managing his own caseload until 1992 when he rejoined as a member of the faculty and the director of the Law Centre. He has taught every clinical law term since then. Glenn has mentored over 1,500 students and has been recognized for his teaching and community contributions many, many times over the years. He has been awarded the University of Victoria Alumni Award for Excellence in Teaching, the law faculty’s Master Teacher Award, the University of Victoria Community Leadership Award acknowledging his exemplary leadership in linking the University of Victoria and the community for the greater public benefit, and the Victoria Bar Association’s Pamela Murray Award recognizing his high professional standards and substantial contributions to the well-being of the local bar. In 2013 Glenn was awarded the Georges A. Goyer, Q.C. Memorial Award for his distinguished contributions to the legal profession and to residents of British Columbia—the highest honour that that can be bestowed by the CBABC. In 2003 the B.C. government was looking for a way to improve the adjudication of human rights issues. It abolished the provincial Human Rights Commission as well as the Advisory Council. The new process provided for direct access to the Human Rights Tribunal, and to assist complainants and respondents with that process, the government decided to fund human rights clinics. The Law Centre was awarded a contract by the B.C. Ministry of Justice to operate one of those clinics and still does so today.


May Advocate 2017
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