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May Advocate 2017

386 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE immediately afterwards). Effervescent water contains the smallest possible bubbles whereas a bold balance involves big, loud bubbles, audible to a level not unfamiliar to those who eat rice-based cereals. Below are my favourite sparkling waters with suggested food pairings, although most of these can be enjoyed entirely on their own or with a light squeeze of lemon or lime, provided the citrus is organically grown and has not been collecting dust on a bar for the better part of a hot afternoon. Badoit, St. Galmier, France, Est. 1837 Badoit has a very light taste despite being a substantial water. This apparent dichotomy is based on the fact that it is effervescent in its balance. Essentially a sparkling water for people who say they do not like sparkling water, this is a good place for a novice to start. With a high level of bicarbonate, this water is also beneficial for digestion. As the bubbles are so light, it can sometimes be viewed as a “gourmet’s mineral water”, so while a good entry water, it should be paired with fine cuisine rather than, say, fish and chips. Hildon Estate, Hampshire, United Kingdom, Est. 1989 Also on the effervescent side of balance, this mineral water has a well-balanced, clean and pure taste. Its virginality is good and its orientation we would describe as neutral. Although the carbonation is added (something of a heresy as far as the Lawyers Assistance Program is concerned), the minerality is good and, as one might suspect, being an English water it is very hard and quite virginal. Unlike the Badoit this does pair very well with fish and chips and HP Sauce. Cape Karoo, Paardeberg, Western Cape, South Africa, Est. 2005 This is a very recent and somewhat cheeky little number from South Africa. The Cape Karoo that we tasted was quite light but slightly hard, a confusing combination that left us breathless in terms of simplicity but confused in terms of complexity. Its virginality was superior and we did note the stunning glass bottle in which the liquid arrived—a nice, slightly blue glass that caught the candlelight well. Paired with some fresh wild boar or a nice springbok, this is a water for sipping or chugging. Tˆ Nant, Bethania, Wales, United Kingdom, Est. a long time ago Tˆ Nant’s natural mineral water is sourced from an ancient aquifer in the small hamlet of Bethania, West Wales. The aquifer, comprising metamorphic mudstones, siltstones and sandstones of the Silurian Period, is approximately 450 million years old. However, it was not discovered until 1976, when water diviner Tom Ashley was looking for domestic water on farmland. The water was officially launched at London’s famous Savoy Hotel in 1989 and comes in an aesthetically pleasing cobalt-blue glass bottle, which


May Advocate 2017
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