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May Advocate 2017

384 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE angry voice. Honestly. Try it. Out loud. Ask other people to try it. You and they have failed. There is no anger in sparkling water. It erupts from the depths of the glass, rises majestically to the top and bursts forth without compromise! Bubbles simply lighten your mood in a way that something from the tap cannot. As a general rule we should not drink what we bathe in. Although we should drink what the Romans bathed in (see below). The power of a glass of sparkling water is apparent the moment it arrives. The sheer mystery of where the constant stream of bubbles even comes from can keep you and your guest mesmerised for the entirety of the meal. No one likes to waste $9.00 on a bottle of San Pellegrino and leave two full glasses on the table, so the next best thing to watching the carbon dioxide dance is to taste it. Raising a glass of sparkling water to one’s lips is one of those anticipatory pleasures that must be experienced to be understood. The best part is actually before you taste it. Your mouth goes all tingly. Perhaps your nose or top lip will be tickled, and some more aggressive versions will gently spray your eyes or even your eyebrows and forehead. It can be most refreshing. The important thing is to DO IT! Order sparkling water. The most famous of the natural sparkling waters is Perrier, captured at its source in Vergèze, France located in the Gard département. Gard is one of the original 83 départements (or administrative regions) created during the French Revolution on March 4, 1790. It was formed from the ancient province of Languedoc in an area known for the Romance language Occitan. Located in this region is a spring originally known as Les Bouillens, the Occitan word for “bubbling spring”, which had been used as a spa since Roman times. A local doctor named Louis Perrier bought the spring in 1898 and ran a commercial spa there. He also bottled the water for sale. Perrier sold the spring to St. John Harmsworth, a British tourist and the younger brother of Lord Northcliffe and Lord Rothermere. Harmsworth marketed the product heavily in the UK as the “champagne of mineral water”. It took off as a chic product and the rest, “c’est l’histoire”, as they say. In 1992 Perrier was purchased by Nestlé. Another natural sparkling water is the aforementioned San Pellegrino, also owned by Nestlé but sourced in Bergamo, Lombardy, Italy. San Pellegrino has a 600-year history having been sampled by no less a celebrity than Leonardo da Vinci in 1509. By 1899 as many as 35,000 bottles were being produced and exported to cities such as Cairo, Tangiers, Shanghai and Calcutta as well as parts of South America, the United States and points antipodean. Meanwhile, in Germany in 1888 carbonated water was discovered during a drilling operation by Wilhelm Castendyck. The resulting mineral water


May Advocate 2017
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