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May Advocate 2017

358 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE (5) If you are brought into an interview room and told by police that everything said and done in this room is videotaped and audio recorded, and that this is a form of protection for both you and the police, that is accurate. But if you do not talk to the police, no one will see the video or hear the audio recording. Exercising your right to silence and refusing to talk to the police cannot be used as evidence against you. (6) When the police tell you that they are just there (a) to show you what the evidence is against you, (b) to tell you that you have the right to know the evidence against you, or (c) to tell you that they want to give you a chance to give your version of what occurred, that may not always be the full story. These interactions may be designed to get you to talk to the police. Do not. It is not to your advantage to talk to them. It is to your advantage not to talk to them. DO NOT TALK TO THE POLICE. (7) Police may advise you that they are just gathering all the evidence and, to be fair, they just want to give you a chance to give your version of what occurred. This does not, however, mean that it is in your best interest to talk. DO NOT TALK TO THE POLICE. (8) The police are there to gather whatever evidence they can, which includes any statements or information from you. DO NOT TALK TO THE POLICE. (9) When the police ask you at the start of the interview, “Have you talked to your lawyer?”, respond by saying, “I do not want to talk to you.” (10) If the police ask you, “Are you satisfied with the advice your lawyer gave you?”, say, “I do not want to talk to you.” (11) Do not engage with the police in general conversation of any kind. When the police ask questions like, “Where were you born?”, “How many brothers and sisters do you have?”, “Whom do you most look up to in your life?”, “Do you drive a car?”, “What kind of car do you have?”, all of these statements are designed to get you talking. They do not really care about any of this. (12) If you are being interrogated in an interview room, you do not have to stay in that room. You are probably positioned in a chair in the far corner of the room against the wall. There are no windows. The police officer is between you and the door. After you have told police that you do not want to talk to them, tell them that you want


May Advocate 2017
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