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51. Gerald Kent, “Robson: A Climber’s Baptism”, Explore Magazine, vol 48 (fall 1990). 52. (Greenwood/Locke route). Gerald Kent, “A Guided Fantasy”, Canadian Alpine Journal (1993) at 28. 53. That is, with no ropes for support or safety. 54. Anders is an honourary member of the BCMC (1989) and was extensively involved in Mountain Equipment Co-op, serving as a director (1981–1986 and 1988–1992), and president (chair) (1989– 1991). MEC made him an honourary member in 2006. He also once appeared before Mr Justice Hutchinson, and competed for the Beverley Cayley scholarship. 55. (BCMC, 1980); supra note 53. 56. With Harry Crerar and Bill Maurer (Rocky Mountain Books, 2018). Online: <www.facebook.com/bagger book/?notif_t=page_fan>. 57. Online: <www.facebook.com/groups/bagger challenge/>. 58. Online: <www.backroadmapbooks.com/ backcountry maps/backroad-mapbooks>. 59. Mr Justice Elliott Myers, of Supreme Court, was a director of Mountain Equipment Co-op (“MEC”) in the mid-1980s. 60. Judge Rodgers was active as a hiker and skier, and a director of MEC from 1980–1984. In 1986 he was elected as a councillor for the District of North Vancouver. He tied for the last position in the polls, with the result being decided by toss of coin—hence his sometime nickname “Landslide” Rodgers. He served his town faithfully, and was appointed to the bench in 1991. 61. Who was, bizarrely, asked to recuse himself from hearing the prosecution of a man accused of hunting and trafficking in eagles, on the basis that the judge was a member of the Alpine Club of Canada, which “provides support for” environmental issues. His Honour declined, which decision was affirmed on appeal: R v Seymour, 2014 BCSC 1886, leave to appeal denied 2015 BCCA 305. 62. Also a former MEC director. 63. Active in the rock climbing and mountaineering communities in the 1970s and early 1980s, later adding surfing to his repertoire. His most notable ascent was Hypertension (1975), a very difficult climb at Squamish. 64. On the executive of the Federation of Mountain Clubs of BC. 65. Well travelled in Rockies and Bugaboos, his resume includes a first ascent of a route on Snowpatch Spire. 66. Active locally and internationally including ascents in China, Japan, Malaysia, Nepal, Bhuta and Tanzania. 67. Extensive climbs in the Rockies and internationally. On the first Canadian climb in the Pamir, in the former USSR (now at the boundary of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan), in the early 1980s, they arrived at the top of Pik Lenin (7134 m). Jay was duly photographed beside the bust of Lenin on the summit. At the time, he was practising in Calgary, and very politically involved. When he returned, the Calgary Herald published the photo, with a caption along the lines of “Jay Straith with his Communist Friend.” 68. Long-time director of the Climbers’ Access Society of BC. 69. Pat climbed Logan and Denali with his brothers Kevin and Jim, the latter being the first Canadian to climb K2, and after whom the ACC’s Jim Haberl Hut, located in the Tantalus Range, northwest of Squamish, is named. 70. Diamond and Steinberg practise as Double Diamond Law, with offices in Squamish and Whistler. 71. Not only a climber, but also one of the leading mountain runners in the world: he was struck by lightning in one of the world’s most gruelling races, the Hardrock 100 Mile Endurance Race, in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. The electricity shattered his headlamp, but he still finished third in the race. Online: <www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure /activities/outdoor-survival/lightning-safety-tips/> accessed 25 July 2016. 72. He has climbed throughout the Rockies, Coast Range, Bugaboos, Purcells and Cascades, including a solo of the north face of Mount Athabasca. 354 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE t t t t t


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