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THE ADVOCATE V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 353 17. King was accompanied by Arthur Tinniswood Dalton, W Dalton, T Pattison, James Trorey and GB Warren. Dalton Dome, Mount Pattison, Mount Trorey and the Warren Glacier are all features in Garibaldi Park named after these early climbers. BCMC, BC Mountaineer, vol 28, issue 12 (1951) at 3. 18. The Vulcan’s Thumb, a subpeak of Mount Cayley, is one of the very few unclimbed peaks within 100 km of Vancouver. It is fearsomely loose and steep. 19. His obituary, the first obituary to appear in the BCMC monthly newsletter, eulogizes him: “The passing of Mr BC Cayley, who for many years was an active member of our organization, came as a great shock to us. Possessed with the true spirit of the Mountaineer, Bev was one whose genial personality made for him a great circle of friends, who held him high in their esteem ...” He is buried in Ocean View Cemetery. See also Janet Turner, The Chronicle That Memory Keeps: Beverley Cochrane Cayley (1898–1928), The Express (December 2008). 20. See Paddy Sherman, Cloud Walkers, (MacMillan, 1965) at 60. 21. 2004 62 Advocate 95. 22. Access to the mountains was an ongoing challenge; the Seaview Highway from Horseshoe Bay to Squamish—now the Sea to Sky Highway—did not open until 1958. To reach peaks around and north of Squamish, it was necessary to take the steamer to that port, the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, and then possibly a horse packer to a destination such as Black Tusk Meadows. 23. The highest peak in the pointy “Five Fingers Group”, visible from North Shore mountains and from upper Pitt Lake. Alpinist poses in modern summit photographs on the Middle Finger are lamentably predictable. 24. So called based on the (now doubted) theory that its flat, bald summit is a remnant of the ancient surface that predates the formation of the Coast Mountains: essentially a flat surface of low relief (a “peneplain”). Uplift and subsequent glaciation and erosion have destroyed most of the original peneplain surface. 25. Who was one of the few to have attended both the 50th and 100th anniversary dinners of the BCMC, the latter shortly before his death. 26. Devil’s club (Oplopanax horridus), the bane of hikers across the Pacific Northwest, is distinguished by its massive leaves, clusters of red poisonous berries and nasty thorns. The thorns, found all over the plant, break easily and can become embedded in skin. To add insult to injury, a rash usually develops. 27. BC Mountaineer 50th Anniversary edition (BCMC, 1957) at 21. 28. 2012 70 Advocate at 904–906. 29. Scott, supra note 7 at 230–231. 30. For more extended biographies of Justice Hutchinson, see: David Roberts, Q.C., “On the Front Cover: The Honourable Mr Justice Ralph MJ Hutchinson.” 2002 60 Advocate 503; David Roberts, Q.C., “Nos Disparus: The Honourable Mr Justice Ralph MJ Hutchinson” (2008) 66 Advocate 430; and Lindsay J Elms, online: <www.beyondnootka.com/biographies /r_hutchinson.html>accessed 22 July 2016. 31. Once known as the “Golden Eyries”. 32. Roy Mason, “New Ascents in Kwoiek Area” Canadian Alpine Journal, vol 42. The Alpine Club of Canada (Banff, Alberta: 1959) at 36–38. 33. Ralph Hutchinson, “Mount Raleigh.” Canadian Alpine Journal, vol 43. The Alpine Club of Canada (Banff, Alberta: 1960) at 30–36. 34. Ralph Hutchinson, “The Lillooet Icefield.” Canadian Alpine Journal, vol 44, The Alpine Club of Canada. (Banff, Alberta: 1961) at 17–27. 35. Scott, supra note 7 at 230–231. 36. Ralph Hutchinson, “Mount McKinley, South Peak.” Canadian Alpine Journal, vol 45. The Alpine Club of Canada (Banff, Alberta: 1962) at 89–101. 37. Scott, supra note 7 at 230–231. 38. 2002 60 Advocate 505. 39. Geoff Suddaby, “First Ascent of Mout Winstone, Taseko Lakes Area, BC, 1963”, Canadian Alpine Journal, vol 47. The Alpine Club of Canada (Banff, Alberta: 1964) at 64–67. There may have been an ascent the previous year. Online: <www.bivouac. com/MtnPg.asp?MtnId=1829 accessed 22 July 2016. 40. 2008 66 Advocate 433. Ralph Hutchinson, “First Ascent Mount British Columbia”, Canadian Alpine Journal, vol 51, The Alpine Club of Canada (Banff, Alberta: 1968) at 52–54. Trivia: Mount Saskatchewan, named for the flattest province, remains unclimbed. It was attempted in 1967 by a women’s group as part of YACE, and has been attempted at least once since then. 41. Ralph Hutchinson. “Koh-I-Baba Capers”, Canadian Alpine Journal, vol 59, The Alpine Club of Canada. (Banff, Alberta: 1976) at 25–26. 42. Arrowsmith is often visible to westbound drivers on Highway 1, just before Horseshoe Bay. Mount Waddington, which Hutchinson also climbed, is visible from Arrowsmith’s summit, and indeed was ‘discovered’ from Arrowsmith and named “Mystery Mountain” by famed mountaineers Don and Phyllis Munday in 1925. 43. Lindsay Elms, Mount Arrowsmith: The Judges Route, online: <www.beyondnootka.com/ articles/judges_ route.htm>l accessed 22 July 2016. 44. And given the initial ascent by three future judges, perhaps a change in punctuation—“Judges’ Route” —would be in order. 45. Paul McEwen died on August 28, 2016, in Nanaimo, while this article was being written. 46. Fred Beckey, Cascade Alpine Guide: Rainy Pass to Fraser River (The Mountaineers, Seattle, 1995) at 150. 47. Ibid at 157. 48. Gordon Soules, 5th rev ed (January 1986). 49. Lone Pine (1994). 50. Online: <www.alpineclubofcanada.ca/bio/brucefairley/>.


May Advocate 2017
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