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May Advocate 2017

348 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE In planning the Raleigh exploration, aerial reconnaissance indicated that it might be possible to land a float plane on Icewall Lake, and then walk 40 kilometres across the Filer Glacier to reach Mount Raleigh. The presence of icebergs on the lake, however, made the landing of the plane a terrifying experience. Hutchinson wrote, “we all waited breathlessly as the plane hopped over the moraines at the north end of the Lake, then effortlessly sank into the water before taxiing through the small icebergs to deposit us on the shore.”36 On his Raleigh and Lillooet Icefield expeditions, his group made first ascents of Mount Raleigh (3132 m), Garrulous Peak (2594 m), Compton Mountain (2879 m), Toba Peak (2795 m), and Mount Tisiphone (3021 m). In 1961, Hutchinson was on the first Canadian expedition to climb Denali (formerly Mount McKinley) in Alaska, the highest peak in North America (6190 m). While successful in gaining the peak, he endured great personal hardship, as his feet were badly frostbitten.37 At base camp, Hutchinson’s toes were described as white and hard, feeling like blocks of ice; when tapped, they sounded like wood. He was flown to Anchorage where the doctor removed the first four of Hutchinson’s toes, all without anesthetic: necessary in order to preserve the circulation in his legs. Hutchinson’s remaining six toes were removed upon return to Nanaimo. Justice Hutchinson was featured on the cover of the Advocate in July 2002.38 The loss of his toes did not slow him down, or deter him from mountaineering. In 1963 he made a first ascent of The Beauty (3099 m), east of Chilko Lake. His 1963 ascent of Mount Winstone (3135 m) was either its first or second.39 In 1964 his group made the first ascent of Mount Harrison (3360 m) near Elkford in the Rockies. In 1967 his group led the first exploration of the Yukon’s Centennial range, one range north of Mount Logan. A peak in the range was named for each (then) province and territory, more or less in geographic order from west to east; he considered it his most difficult adventure.40 On this trip he made the first ascent of Mount British Columbia (3100 m). He was the first to climb Mount Noel (3062 m) in the Stikine (1981). His climbing exploits were international: he climbed peaks on every continent except for Australia and Antarctica, and several of his climbs in Peru (1969 and 1978) and Afghanistan (1975) were first ascents.41 In autumn 1974 Hutchinson blazed the Judge’s Route on the impressive multi-peaked Mount Arrowsmith (1819 m), towering over Port Alberni: steep but accessible, it is the most popular and direct route up the mountain. 42 The story of that route has multiple legal connections.43 At the time, Hutchinson was practising in Nanaimo with his partners Jim Shabbits and Jim Taylor; all three would be appointed to the Supreme Court (in 1991, 1992, 1995, respectively). That week, Hutchinson had been offered a judi-


May Advocate 2017
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