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May Advocate 2017

346 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE series of first ascents of mountains between the Coquitlam River and Pitt Lake, and north of Widgeon Lake:22 Middle Finger23 (1890 m) (1938), Mount Lou (1741 m) (1938), Consolation Dome (1803 m) (1939), Obelisk Peak (1777 m) (1939) and Peneplain Peak (1707 m) (1939).24 He also made the first ascent of Ipsoot Mountain (2576 m), due north of Whistler and due west of Pemberton. He was an officer in the Irish Fusiliers; during the Second World War, he trained troops in the Rockies in mountaineering. Pilkington served as the editor of the BCMC Bulletin (1950–1952) and as BCMC president (1954–1956). With Ralph Hutchinson,25 he served on the BCMC 50th Anniversary Committee, and in the anniversary publication, published a rueful essay on the quintessential west coast climbing activity: shin-lacerating bushwhacks up steep, shrubby, soggy slopes: Probably the most neglected aspect of mountaineering is bushwhacking. Not only is it avoided whenever possible by climbers, but it is ignored by all writers of alpine manuals … Be patient and don’t fight the forest. Here is a posse of devil’s club,26 snaky, prickly and just rarin’ to tangle with you in a bout of scratch as scratch can. If you slap it with your ice-axe it swings away and smacks right back at your face with the unerring aim of a medieval quintain. If you trample it, it lashes up at your hands as soon as you remove your weight. All you can do is wiggle your way through trying to avoid contact between your bare skin and the horrid stuff.27 Mount Pilkington (2828 m), just southwest of Taseko Lakes, is named after him. Jack Cade was a prominent member of the BCMC who participated in first ascents of Weeskinisht Peak (2747 m), the tallest of the Seven Sisters, east of Cedarvale (1941) and Icefall S1 (3063 m) in Banff National Park, near the Ram River Glacier (1972).28 He practised in Prince Rupert in 1941 and the Cariboo in 1971. John Beltz (1923 Vancouver–2013 Vancouver) was both a teacher and lawyer. Phyllis’s Engine (2570 m), at the east end of Garibaldi Lake, is named for his mother, who saw it from the Black Tusk area on a summer camp, and exclaimed that it looked like a railroad engine. John was active in the BCMC for much of his life, and latterly was very involved in the Right to Quiet Society, establishing the Friends of Cypress Provincial Park, and various environmental causes. John was perhaps the first person in Canada to be arrested for protesting in support of public access to parks, after that park was largely privatized by the provincial government in 1984. ‘Jim’ James Adam Craig (1924 Sangudo, Alberta—2012 Vancouver) came from an ethnic German family that emigrated from Hungary to Alberta after World War I. After wartime service in the RCAF, travels, and school, he articled with Victor Butts, and was called to the bar in 1957. Jim


May Advocate 2017
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