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May Advocate 2017

THE ADVOCATE V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 341 LET THE SKY FALL: LAWYERS IN THE HISTORY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA MOUNTAINEERING PART II – THE MOUNTAINEERS By David Crerar, Anders Ourom and Harry Crerar* Part I of this article “The Mountains” appeared in (2017) 75 Advocate 75. It detailed the topography of British Columbia that owes so much to the legal history of this province. Part II of this article focuses on the mountaineers: judges and lawyers who have at least given mountaineering, climbing, scrambling or backcountry skiing a try. We will avoid the question as to “what is a mountaineer?” To paraphrase a famous remark by a judge with regard to obscenity, we know one when we see one. Of course, many may dabble, but few (so to speak) are called to a lifetime avocation in the mountains. JURIST MOUNTAINEERS Sir Matthew Baillie Begbie The assizes and circuits of Chief Justice Sir Matthew Baillie Begbie (1819 Mauritius–1894 Victoria) put him among the greatest adventurers in British Columbia history. His first assize, in March 1859, took him from New Westminster to the gold fields of Yale and beyond, up the Fraser Canyon. Travelling on foot, Begbie’s four-man party went from Yale to Spuzzum, crossed the Fraser at Chapman’s Bar to the east bank, and followed the Hudson’s * The authors wish to thank the following for their assistance with this article: Daien Ide and Janet Turner (North Vancouver Museum and Archives), Bernice Chong and Jacquie Reagh (the Law Society of British Columbia Archives), Carla Jack (Provincial Toponymist, B.C. Geographical Names Office), David Roberts, Q.C., Dr. Glenn Woodsworth, Bruce Fairley, Gerry Kent, Patrick Dearden, Andrew Wilkinson, Q.C., Todd Gerhardt, Robin Tivy (bivouac.com), John Hutchinson, Joe Bajan, Michaela Donnelly, Simon Chesterton, and Katie Heung and Jessica Guichon of Borden Ladner Gervais LLP.


May Advocate 2017
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