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May Advocate 2017

474 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE blooming in the forest glades in early spring, signifies Nova Scotia’s coming of age. As far back as 1820 the mayflower emerged as a native patriotic symbol, suggesting high achievement in the face of adversity.” The Miami Herald recently reported that Stephen Gutierrez, a Miami defence lawyer, accidentally set his pants on fire during closing argument in front of a jury—in an arson case. Gutierrez, who was arguing that his client’s car spontaneously combusted and was not intentionally set on fire, was fiddling in his pocket as he addressed jurors when smoke began billowing out his right pocket, witnesses reported. He rushed out of the courtroom, leaving spectators stunned. After jurors were ushered out, Gutierrez returned to the courtroom unharmed, with a singed pocket, and insisted it was not a staged defence demonstration gone wrong. Gutierrez blamed his sartorial smoke on a faulty battery in an e-cigarette he had been fiddling with in his pocket. Though we doubt their enthusiasm manifests itself in the same manner, Mayflower Solicitors of Birmingham, England says that it conducts its business “in a refreshingly enthusiastic and efficient manner aiming to provide a totally transparent service built on integrity, trust and a genuine passion to deliver the highest quality and value to our clients.” Roper Greyell LLP is one of the first law firms in Canada to create the position of chief executive officer and it recently appointed Linda Lucas, a chartered professional accountant, to that role. In news from the Gulf Islands, the provincial government recently ordered that a vote take place on September 17, 2017 to determine whether the electors of Salt Spring Island are in favour of incorporating as a municipality. On February 3, 2017, at the seventh General Assembly of the International Criminal Bar held in Valencia, Spain, Roxanne Helme, Q.C., of Victoria completed a second term on the governing council, latterly as representative for the Canadian Bar Association and as co-president. The Court of Appeals of Illinois, Second District, noted in Rich v. Naperville (City) in 1891, that “ever since the landing of the Pilgrims from the Mayflower the right to assemble and worship according to the dictates of one’s conscience, and the right to parade in a peaceable manner and for a lawful purpose, have been fostered and regarded as among the fundamental rights of a free people.”


May Advocate 2017
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