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May Advocate 2017

456 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE months. The CRT’s website is: <www.civilresolutionbc.ca>. In the last year alone, we have provided advice to or received delegations of judges, public servants or tribunal members from places as diverse as Alberta, Australia, New York, the Netherlands, Ontario, Utah and Singapore. Lord Justice Briggs, who authored the Civil Courts Structure Review for the Courts of England and Wales (online: <www.judiciary.gov.uk/ wp-content/uploads/2016/07/ civil-courts-structure-review-finalreport jul-16-final-1.pdf>), spent a fair bit of time with us and his recommendation that Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service adopt an online court is due in large part to lessons learned from our very own CRT. In his keynote speech entitled “Mediation and the Civil Courts” delivered to the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators last September, Lord Justice Briggs acknowledged British Columbia’s leadership: How does all this affect mediation? First and foremost, it brings what we still call ADR into the mainstream of civil dispute resolution, by becoming an essential second stage in the court’s process. It makes resolution by the parties a culturally and actually normal part of civil dispute resolution, rather than something alternative to the mainstream. In short, it seeks to take the ‘A’ out of ADR. That is why I would like to see the new court called a Resolution or Solutions Court, following the lead set by British Columbia. My second question relates to the sentence “This has been tried before”. Might your readers detect a whiff of defeatism in that sentence? Now is not the time for defeatism. With report after report calling for fundamental change in our justice system, with the Supreme Court of Canada highlighting the “culture of delay and complacency” in its Jordan decision and with Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service recognizing the UK’s opportunity to follow British Columbia’s lead in transforming its justice system, now is the time for optimism and a rededication of the Advocate to serving as a thought leader, not a thought laggard. Please join me in recognizing and celebrating all the hard work undertaken by the individuals in the public and private sector who are leading these efforts in British Columbia. If you or any of your staff would like to know more about the CRT, please do let me know and I can arrange for ministry staff to bring you up to date or put you in touch with Ms. Shannon Salter, Chair of the CRT. I do look forward to the next issue of the Advocate. Yours very truly, Suzanne Anton, Q.C. Attorney General and Minister of Justice of BC


May Advocate 2017
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