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May Advocate 2017

440 V VOL.O L . 75 7 5 PART P A R T 3 3 M MAY A Y 2017 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE result of which is displayed regularly in his attempt to play hockey in an informal men’s league in Kimberley. Not one to use his elbows in the corner he makes up for his lack of talent with enthusiasm. Lynal completed his schooling at Beaver Lodge High School in 1982. His favourite memories of growing up on the farm include horse riding (until he received his driver’s licence and realized he needed more horsepower) and participating in the 4H club raising cows for cash. Alas, a career involving his first love, the violin, was not meant to be, given the lack of talented violin teachers in Beaver Lodge. Having never heard Lynal play the violin it is difficult to assess his potential, but he contends that he would have displaced Nigel Kennedy as the most innovative interpreter of Vivaldi’s “The Four Seasons”. Following high school Lynal left the farm for the big city of Edmonton where he attended the University of Alberta, graduating in 1986 with a bachelor of arts degree with distinction. He majored in history with a minor in philosophy (which now explains a lot of things, including his introspection and discourses on the meaning of life in the company of his various friends and colleagues at the annual Crown conferences, where his absinthe parties gained some notoriety). Lynal humbly advises that he decided to pursue law school because he had asthma and other allergies that did not suit a farmer’s life. However, in truth it is clear to all who know him, and have had the good fortune of working with him, that his intellectual abilities and skills were more suited to a career in the legal profession. While at law school Lynal met a physiotherapy student, Tania, whom he pursued and eventually persuaded to become his wife in 1991. Tania, who is a practising physiotherapist with a clinic in Cranbrook, and he are very proud of their two lovely and athletic daughters, Hanna and Mya. Upon graduation from the University of Alberta law school in 1989 Lynal articled with the City of Calgary as a solicitor conducting small claims matters and assisting with personal injury claims against the city. He speaks well of his articles and of his principal, Adel Abougoush, now deceased. However, Lynal was determined to keep close ties with his family, who had relocated to Fort McMurray, and he quickly obtained an associate position there with a small firm, Harley Millo & Co., where he practised “door law”. A desire to be a full-time barrister spurred him to seek and obtain a position as a Crown prosecutor with the Fort McMurray Crown office, a position he held for almost five years before the government of the day decided to reduce its staff. He returned to the City of Calgary for a year before again rejoining the Fort McMurray Crown office in 1998. The lure of the courtroom was simply too much to ignore.


May Advocate 2017
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