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May Advocate 2017

436 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE 1976 (who now lives and works in California, for his dad’s former company, but more on that in a bit). While still in high school, Lance took a job at a MacBlo particle board mill on Marine Drive. To support his growing family, he carried on with that job while advancing his education right through to completion of his LL.B. He took the midnight shift in the control centre (more a shack) where he could study when not watching the dials. He also picked up his millwright and steam tickets on the theory that if he did not get his law degree they would form the basis for plan B. It was not necessary in the end, but Lance always looked at life from every angle. In recent years, he also thought it fitting yet funny when he started receiving a small IWA pension. It was in law school in 1977 that our paths crossed. At that time we started a joking tradition where we began every phone call and get-together within the salutations, “Lance, old son” and “Michael my boy”. Lance, Gord Weatherill (now Weatherill J.) and I supported and bolstered each other along the way to our degrees. We also, along with Gord’s twin brother Gary (also now Weatherill J.) and Bob Kuhn (now the periodically embattled president of TWU), set up a process-serving company to make some extra cash. We called it Schooner Services, and employed some of our other classmates to assist in what quickly grew into a fairly thriving enterprise, with a clientele that cut across the Vancouver legal community. In those days, before computers, cell phones, and all the other technology that runs the world now, we used a beeper linked to our landline phone number to receive notice of call-outs. As it was quite loud and we were often in lectures, we had to set it to vibration mode. It was always a lively discussion as to whose turn it was to wear the vibrator in class. Lance articled with Bob Ross, who had a busy personal injury practice in Vancouver (which Genevieve tells me meant that they were never able to enjoy such childhood joys as trampolines). Lance stayed on as an associate for some months before life took another course. One highlight was his first (and only) appearance in the Court of Appeal, where he won what he claimed with amusement was an outstanding victory by saying nothing. (He was on for the respondent and it was one of those hopeless attempts at persuading the appellate court to intervene.) But he was in fact always very articulate, which was one of the many reasons for which he was chosen to be the emcee when I married. It was at this time that his father perfected an invention that would change the lives of the entire Taylor family: a knee brace hinge that was to be the basis for a family-run firm called Generation II Orthotics Inc., which all the Taylor clan came together to operate. It grew from a small operation


May Advocate 2017
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