Page 115

May Advocate 2017

THE ADVOCATE V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 433 expect have influenced most everyone who was a part of Greg’s life, personally or professionally. The legal community has lost a great man. His family has lost a great father and husband. My partner, thank you. You will be missed. Rodney D. Urquhart Gowan T. Guest, Q.C. t t t t t Our profession lost both a leader and a character on December 7, 2016. I am probably too young to be writing about Gowan—as I never actually practised law with him—but I was lucky enough to have known him most of my life, and I am a member of Owen Bird in part due to a most valuable life lesson he passed along to me. Gowan was born in Toronto in 1929 but did not show much interest in staying there. In the early 1950s he transferred out of Osgoode Hall and moved to Vancouver to complete law school at UBC. It was here that Gowan started to plant his roots. Of course, as anyone who knew Gowan might have predicted, it was not to be a straight path. After moving to the west coast, instead of settling into the practice of law, Gowan chose to pursue his love of politics. He had the exceptional opportunity to be the executive assistant to Prime Minister John Diefenbaker back in Ottawa. This training would bode well for him going forward. He used this springboard to combine his interests into a career that spanned law, business and politics. While Prime Minister Diefenbaker talked Gowan out of running as a Conservative candidate in B.C., he always kept a pulse on politics. In fact, this interest in public policy led him to become one of the co-founders of The Electors’ Action Movement (“TEAM”), which played a prominent role in Vancouver’s civic political scene in the 1970s. Gowan was called to the bar of B.C. on June 10, 1955. In 1961 Gowan returned to Vancouver, got married and launched his legal career. He articled to C. George Robson. He was later called to the bar of Ontario in 1963.


May Advocate 2017
To see the actual publication please follow the link above