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May Advocate 2017

432 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE her case. But then again, Greg was not a typical lawyer. This happened more than once. Greg was very active in the legal community. For example, when the British Columbia Law Reform Commission came to an end it was Greg who, with the assistance of others, helped to establish its replacement, the British Columbia Law Institute (“BCLI”). Greg went on to serve as the chair of BCLI for a number of years. During his time with BCLI Greg participated on the project committee on legal issues affecting seniors. This project led to the creation of the Canadian Centre for Elder Law (“CCEL”) which is a division of BCLI. The CCEL established the Gregory K. Steele, Q.C. Prize in 2005, which is awarded at CCEL for the best paper on an elder law topic by a graduate or undergraduate student in law. Greg likewise worked with the B.C. Branch of the Canadian Bar Association on a number of initiatives. This includes serving as chair of the committee on legislation and law reform. Greg was the first private bar representative to serve with the British Columbia delegation to the Uniform Law Conference of Canada in over a decade. Greg was also invited to be a member of the Canadian delegation to the Special Commission of the Hague Conference on Private International Law. As if that were not enough, he decided to co-author a book in the area of employment law. There are now three editions. In 2002 Greg was recognized for his accomplishments in the law by being appointed Queen’s Counsel. One anecdote, if you do not mind. As many readers will know, at one point in his battle with his illness Greg received a bone marrow transplant. Now this is a bit of a difficult process with a particularly long recovery. During this process one of his nurses explained to Greg that he would be very tired for quite a long time and that he should think of taking up a calming and relaxing hobby. She explained that some patients like to paint tiles, others like to crochet. Greg said he would think about it. Two days later the nurse came and asked if he had thought of a calming and relaxing hobby. Greg said he had and told the nurse that he was going to get his pilot’s license. The nurse was aghast but, as many of you will know, it was not too much later before Greg was in a plane taking flying lessons out of the Boundary Bay Airport. Throughout Greg’s lengthy battle with his illness he demonstrated a great strength of conviction and compassion. He was always willing to help, lend an ear and offer some advice no matter how he was feeling. He did this for me and for many others, right to the end. Those qualities, in the face of such adversity, are ones that leave a lasting impression, and I


May Advocate 2017
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