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May Advocate 2017

THE ADVOCATE V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 421 a platform developed by Neota Logic to create apps that are built specifically to facilitate greater access to justice or lower costs of legal services. Professor Craig Jones, Q.C., also continues to serve as a litigator when time can be found. He appeared before the B.C. Court of Appeal in February on Jiang v. Peoples Trust Company (a consumer class action certification case; judgment has been reserved) and made two appearances at Law Society of B.C. administrative hearings. As for ongoing matters, he is also counsel for the plaintiff in the ongoing constitutional class action against the B.C. government over the B.C. foreign home buyers tax (Li v. The Queen), and for a complainant in the publicized proceeding before the provincial Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner styled as Erb v. Surrey Creep Catchers, an Unincorporated Association regarding the activities of the Surrey Creep Catchers vigilante group in “outing” individuals that are allegedly involved in child sexual abuse. FACULTY DEVELOPMENTS Through the active leadership of Professors Janna Promislow, Nicole Schabus and Charis Kamphuis, 100 first-year TRU law students, along with TRU president Alan Shaver and TRU staff, participated in the sixth annual daylong visit to the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. Now known as the Chief Louis Centre, which is located on the unceded, unsurrendered Aboriginal title lands recognized as an Indian reserve of the Tk’emlúps te Secwepemc. The day was hosted by Councillor Viola Thomas and began with a welcome song by a group of students from the Sk’elep School of Excellence. Our group spent the day on site, hearing from a number of residential school survivors and family members and from local Provincial ’ Court Judge Len Marchand for a judge’s perspective on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s final report and accompanying recommendations. The students also toured a former school dorm, the chapel and the neighbouring Secwepemc Heritage Museum. Residential school survivors accompanied each group and facilitated discussion during the tours. This trip was bookended by a three-hour class of all first-year law students discussing assigned readings and the history of Indian residential schools in advance of the visit and then afterwards by another class exploring what key lessons emerged from the experience. These sessions also benefited from the insights of Councillor Viola Thomas, to whom we are very grateful for her leadership and commitment. Our faculty is currently exploring, as is the Law Society of B.C. and the CLEBC, how we can more effectively fulfil the challenge embedded in the TRC’s Call to Action directed at law schools and legal education.


May Advocate 2017
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