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420 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE sizing choice over protection. The Act has, however, left virtually no case trail, although anecdotal accounts indicate that use of the legislation is increasing, after a period of many years of relative disuse. Anecdotal evidence also suggests that lawyers and notaries (including those working in practice areas involving wills and estates and advance planning who may be expected to encounter the kinds of scenarios to which Part 3 of the Adult Guardianship Act may be relevant) have a generally low awareness of the legislation. The objective of this project is to ascertain the level and extent of awareness among legal providers about Part 3 of the Act after 17 years of its existence and evaluate how the legislation is being implemented (for whom and for what purpose) within the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority and the Interior Health Authority. I must admit that it is exceedingly hard, while serving as dean of law, to pursue research myself at the level to which I had previously been accustomed and enjoyed. Nevertheless, I did deliver the keynote presentation, “Protecting ITK through ITK Owners Direct Involvement in Its Governance and Use: The Canadian Experience”, at the Governance Systems for Data Management and Benefit Sharing Conference this past December, which was hosted by the Indigenous Knowledge Forum at the University of Technology Sydney Faculty of Law. The conference culminated in the launch at the Museum of Contemporary Art of the book Indigenous Knowledge Forum – Comparative Systems for Recognising and Protecting Indigenous Knowledge and Culture (LexisNexis Butterworths Australia, 2016) that was inspired by a conference hosted by the Indigenous Knowledge Forum in 2014. My contribution to that volume, edited by Natalie P. Stoianoff, is entitled “The Uphill Struggle to Protect Indigenous Traditional Knowledge in Settler States that Value Short-Term Private Ownership: How Is Canada Doing?” I was subsequently appointed to the Garuwanga Research Roundtable on Indigenous Traditional Knowledge hosted by the Intellectual Property Law Program at the University of Technology Sydney. While legal academics are often perceived by practitioners as being off in ivory towers (I would actually welcome seeing some more ivory in place of the many concrete buildings that tend to dominate Canadian universities), that is frequently not the case. Professor Katie Sykes was one of five speakers at the Yale County Women’s Law Forum weekend retreat at the lovely Sparkling Hill Resort and Spa in Vernon on April 7–9 on the topic, “Lawyering in the 21st Century”. The title is also the name of a new, highly creative course launched this past semester led by Professor Sykes in partnership with the software company Neota Logic. This course concentrates upon enabling law students with little or no prior computer programming expertise to work with


May Advocate 2017
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