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418 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 3 M A Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE Appellants: Callan MacKinlay (3L) and Grace Kim (3L); Respondents: Grace McDonell (2L) and Annie Olson (2L); and Researcher: Milad Javdan (3L). The faculty in March welcomed 17 law firms from across B.C. and Alberta as well as the B.C. Ministry of Justice to a very successful second annual TRU Law Career Fair organized by our very talented Director of Career Services, Christi McAuley. SCHOLARSHIP Professor Craig Jones, Q.C., presented (via Skype) at a Toronto Ecojustice conference on toxic torts in February, in which he delivered the opening address and a presentation on “Class Actions in Toxic Tort”, focused on class actions for environmental damage. Dr. Lorne Neudorf is the deservedly proud author of the new book The Dynamics of Judicial Independence: A Comparative Study of Courts in Malaysia and Pakistan, which was published by Springer in March and can be purchased online: <www.springer.com/us/book/9783319498836>. This book examines the legal principle of judicial independence from a comparative perspective with the goal of advancing a better understanding of the idea of an independent judiciary more generally. From an initial survey of judicial systems in different countries, it is clear that the understanding and practice of judicial independence take a variety of forms. Scholarly literature likewise provides a range of views on what judicial independence means, with scholars often advocating a preferred conception of a model court for achieving “true judicial independence” as part of a rule of law system. This book seeks to reorient the prevailing approach to the study of judicial independence by fostering a better understanding of how judicial independence operates within domestic legal systems in its institutional and legal dimensions. It asks how and why different conceptualizations of judicial independence emerge over time by comparing detailed case studies of courts in two legally pluralistic states that share inheritances of British rule and the common law. By tracing the development of judicial independence in the legal systems of Malaysia and Pakistan from the time of independence to the present, the book offers an insightful comparison of how judicial independence took shape and developed in these countries over time. From this comparison, it suggests a number of contextual factors that can be seen to play a role in the evolution of judicial independence. The study draws upon the significant divergence observed in the case studies to propose a refined understanding of the idea of an independent judiciary, termed the “prag-


May Advocate 2017
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