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180 teer time has been spent mentoring more than one generation of lawyers arriving in South Surrey and White Rock. At least one colleague has also suggested that, according to one traditional view of what libraries should be, Jane would be required to exercise some restraint in speaking her mind, usually in less than a whisper. The draw of show business continued, however, in the form of CLE sessions, professional legal training and Law Society seminars from 1981 to the present, in which she is consistently highly rated. On a range of topics including mortgages, real estate, family law, estates and elder law, Jane has participated in a parade of what she refers to as “tag-team matches”, “dog and pony shows” and “other ploys designed to deflate the pomposity and inflate the practical”. When she or other senior lawyers declare that “I’m only a country lawyer”, one should remember that those who have been in the trenches for a generation probably have learned a few things along the way. She recalls making a CLE role-playing video in which she felt that the “actor” (a well-known lawyer) appeared a little too dignified in his role as a gormless lawyer. She persuaded him to discreetly unzip his fly, pull his shirttail through the gap and re-zip. This was sufficient to take the dull edges off a course entitled, “The Basics of Wills and Estate Planning for Lawyers”. This parade of courses for lawyers and many rounds of courses for non-lawyers has given Jane the opportunity to sit at a virtual librarian’s information desk and give advice, with the proper disclaimer. Along the way, in 1992, Jane was honoured with her Queen’s Counsel designation in a year when political affiliation was not an issue. A committee of individuals from the bench and bar (similar in structure to the present committee) made the recommendations to the NDP government, which had debated abolishing the traditional designation but had ultimately decided to continue the appointments. In a January 1993 letter to the Vancouver Sun, Peter Leask, then treasurer of the Law Society, wrote: Your editorial on Queen’s Counsel appointments asked why Attorney- General Colin Gablemann revived the title. The answer is that he asked the Law Society of B.C. if QCs should continue to be awarded, and we said yes—provided the appointments were made on a non-political basis. In 1992, a list of candidates in order of merit was put forward to the attorney-general unanimously by the chief justice of the B.C. Court of Appeal, the chief justice of the Supreme Court of B.C., the chief judge of the provincial court and the treasurer and deputy treasurer of the law society. Mr. Gablemann appointed the first 10 people from this list, without additions or deletions … V O L . 7 5 P A R T 2 M A R C H 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE


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