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THE ADVOCATE V O L . 7 5 P A R T 2 M A R C H 2 0 1 7 179 atively small community where her father and grandfather were physicians. Her grandfather was active in the Canadian Medical Association, and her father was very active in and served as president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba, receiving a life membership. They were both, at heart, family doctors with deep commitment to their community. Jane’s grandmother and mother had been nurses in the same community with equal activism for their generation. This perception of an idyllic childhood was reinforced with older brother Frank and younger, red-headed sister Bets, who, with parents, resemble Jane’s grade 1 reader, “We Work and Play”, with the adorable Sally, Dick and Jane as leading characters. Jane received her bachelor of arts degree from the University of Saskatchewan and her law degree from the University of Manitoba. Jane’s commitment to the community shone through in law school, where Jane was elected the first female president of the student body, allegedly on the dual platform of “let’s party” and “more female washrooms”. Hers was the second year of the major influx of women within the law student population (two years prior only five per cent were women and in Jane’s year as president thirty per cent) and the beginning of women law students entering into intramural sports including football and hockey. Jane played on both women’s teams and recalls that Don Jordan (later appointed Q.C.), then a year her senior at law school, was coach. Those were heady days indeed. Jane had the opportunity, as law school president, to host Lord Denning on his Manitoba tour, sharing various meals with the honoured guest. Her duties included taking food tongs to the plates of greedy and hungry law students (who had left no food for the honoured guest) and carefully making up a plate for the Master of the Rolls. Lest her days in law school impress too much, Jane is quick to point out that she enrolled because she was rejected from library school. Her dream of sitting at the information desk at a library remains, primarily because a librarian doles out advice and facts without the need for errors and omissions insurance. If one goes back to Brandon, and perhaps grade 11, the puzzle is solved. The reason why Jane has embraced the frightening ideal of general practice, and her weekly ration of books on every conceivable topic, was her initial exposure as a representative of Brandon High School on the TV quiz show “Reach for the Top”, during which she secured a plane trip to participate in the regional championship in Calgary. Perhaps because of a sticky buzzer, Brandon was not able to reach the top. Jane’s colleagues in White Rock have reason to thank the library school for rejecting her application, primarily because a good portion of her volun-


March Pages 2017
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