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THE ADVOCATE V O L . 7 5 P A R T 2 M A R C H 2 0 1 7 289 opinions, in paragraphs, with case citations. At 5:00 a.m.: her daily run. By 7:00 a.m.: in the office getting a head start on the day. Flash Forward: 2006. Joyce is named deputy director of CASP, in charge of the Prosecution Support Unit (“PSU”), which assists front-line trial prosecutors with difficult and complex constitutional issues and arguments. She has envisioned and created the PSU; she manages it and she does a large share of the casework. By now she has also become a seasoned veteran of the B.C. Court of Appeal and Supreme Court of Canada, recognized for her forceful and compelling advocacy. Rumour has it that several justices at the Supreme Court of Canada refer to her as “Xena the Warrior Princess” for her powerful submissions. For Joyce it is never enough to ask what the law is: her mission is to tell the court what the law can and should be. Often she turns out to be right. More than a few of her clear and complete analytical frameworks form the basis for judgments of the Supreme Court of Canada. Joyce develops a particular interest in the law of prosecutorial independence. She speaks at conferences and authors learned papers on the topic. Eventually she ends up appearing as counsel on every significant case on the topic to reach the Supreme Court of Canada between 2002 and 2016. Flash Forward: 2010. For creating the PSU, Joyce wins the Ministry of Justice Exemplary Service Award for Innovation. For being a stellar advocate, Joyce is appointed Queen’s Counsel, following in some notable footsteps. In honour of her Q.C. appointment, someone gives Joyce a fancy red pen. It becomes her surgical tool of choice for editing, revising and (everyone will readily acknowledge) improving the legal writing of her colleagues. Inside CASP and PSU, people start speaking of the “red-pen effect”. A support group develops: “SORPA” (Survivors of Red Pen Anonymous). Flash Forward: 2012. Joyce is appointed assistant deputy attorney general in charge of the Criminal Justice Branch. Her expertise on the topic of prosecutorial independence comes in particularly handy as she deftly navigates the independent prosecution service past the perilous shoals of partisan politics. In recognition of her exceptional contributions to the legal profession, to jurisprudence and to the law in British Columbia, Joyce receives the Canadian Bar Association’s Georges A. Goyer, QC Memorial Award for Distinguished Service. Flash Forward: Early 2016. An external review of the BC Prosecution Service celebrates Joyce’s vision, her innovative leadership and her work on justice reform. Inside the Ministry of Justice, Joyce is revered for her extraordinary mentorship, her support of her staff and her absolute devo-


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