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280 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 2 M A R C H 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE where Mac formed part of an excellent basketball team, which came third in the 1961 high school provincial championship. Warne Tyler remembers their school football team, which Warne quarterbacked, but due to the abject failure of his offensive ends (Dave McDonald and Mac) to block for him, he spent most of the time handing the football off to his running back, Brent Gifford. If you are interested in lacrosse and the history of New Westminster, then I recommend the excellent history of lacrosse in British Columbia from 1880–2013 written by W.B. MacDonald, son of the late Walter MacDonald, entitled Salmonbellies vs. the World: The Story of Lacrosse’s Most Famous Team & Their Greatest Rivals. Lacrosse used to be the crosstown rivalry between New Westminster and Vancouver. Crowds of up to 15,000 people would watch field lacrosse at Queen’s Park. So great was the rivalry that the owner of the Vancouver lacrosse team hired Newsy Lalonde for $5,000 a season, when Lalonde was being paid $1,200 a season to play for the Montreal Canadiens. Lacrosse is a rigorous but skilled game played by hard, tough men (and women) who run three to five miles a game, and the battles described in the book are epic. The Mann Cup, initially donated in 1910, is the symbol of the senior club lacrosse championship of Canada. The Salmonbellies have won the cup 24 times. For a long time the Salmonbellies set the standard for excellence, making them comparable to the Montreal Canadiens or the New York Yankees or the New Zealand All Blacks, save for the compensation (one of the best financial rewards was a place on the New Westminster Fire Department). Mac was on three Mann Cup teams, and was captain his last three years. He started out as a 165-pound “lawn dart” and by the time I started watching him, Mac was in his prime at six-foot-four, 230 pounds, occupying the corner of the opponent’s goal on the power play and taking a fearful beating from opponents’ sticks as he would take a pass and wheel toward the goalie with those long arms reaching out to snap a shot. Dr. Radford regularly drained his elbows, hip and knee of fluids pre-game. He played 305 games from 1964–73 with 307 goals and 262 assists, and was inducted into the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 2006. Mac started at UBC while working in local wood firms, and he graduated in 1965. He then went on to complete a two-year master’s degree in physical education at McMaster. He met Bonnie in 1965 as she was graduating from nursing at Royal Columbian Hospital where she was president of her graduating class. Mac


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