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THE ADVOCATE V O L . 7 5 P A R T 2 M A R C H 2 0 1 7 263 Mills’s doctoral supervisor at the UVic Faculty of Law. “It is rare to encounter someone as well prepared to make an immediate impact through his scholarship and leadership skills.” Professor Val Napoleon was honoured with the Indigenous Peoples’ Counsel designation in Vancouver on October 14, 2016 at the annual conference of the Indigenous Bar Association. Professor Napoleon holds the Law Foundation Chair of Aboriginal Justice and Governance at the University of Victoria and is one of Canada’s most influential Indigenous scholars. She founded the Indigenous Law Research Unit (“ILRU”), which is the only dedicated Indigenous law research program in the country. Under her direction, the ILRU partnered with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Indigenous Bar Association on a pathbreaking project in which researchers worked intensively with Indigenous communities to identify resources within their own legal traditions to address the challenges they face. That project informed much of the Indigenous law content of the TRC’s final report, particularly Call to Action 50, which calls for the establishment of institutes of Indigenous law. Professor Calvin Sandborn, Legal Director of the Environmental Law Centre, received the Victoria Bar Association’s Contribution to the Law Award on November 3, 2016 for his impact on environmental law, and in particular his work on the rehabilitation of the Jordan River on Vancouver Island. Old mining operations had polluted the river so badly that there were very few fish left, and no salmon had returned for nearly 50 years. Biologist Dave Burt turned to Professor Sandborn for help and he, along with then law student Matthew Nefstead, followed a trail of previous mine owners to track down who was responsible for the polluted land. With the help of BC Hydro, Teck Resources, Western Forest Products and former property owners, a remediation plan is in the works, and the salmon are already returning to the river. This is an inspiring and hopeful example of environmental rehabilitation and the role environmental law can play in making it happen. Professor Sandborn has dedicated his career to using the law to solve just such problems, so this is a well-deserved award. Professor Jeremy Webber, who currently serves as dean of the UVic Faculty of Law, was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (“RSC”). Professor Webber is a world-renowned scholar and author in the areas of cultural diversity, constitutional theory and Indigenous rights. “The great task of any society,” he says, “is how to affirm principles to govern society—how to maintain mechanisms for making decisions that


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