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72 THE ADVOCATE 72 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 1 J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 7 Work on the Employment Standards Act reform project has also progressed. The committee members continue to wrestle with the many issues that must be addressed, and we look forward to being able to publish the committee’s consultation paper in 2017. We also wish to express our appreciation to the BC Federation of Labour for making time for a presentation to the officers at their April 2016 meeting and the financial support that followed from the BC Government Employees’ Union and the Hospital Employees’ Union. This support for our work is important, as it reinforces our non-partisan and non-political approach to law reform. The Builders Lien Act reform project committee was equally dedicated and has made good progress. We are looking forward to this committee’s consultation paper in 2017. As this article goes to print, we expect to have published the fourth edition of our popular resource Questions and Answers About Pension Division on the Breakdown of a Relationship in British Columbia and wish to express our gratitude to Tom Anderson, Q.C., for his dedication to this resource over the years. The Canadian Centre for Elder Law (“CCEL”) has also been busy, wrapping up three major projects and initiating three more. Please see our website3 for the reports and resources that have been produced from these collaborative projects described in past “News” columns—the Older Women’s Dialogue Project Phase 2, the Older Women’s Legal Education Project, and Elder Abuse in Chinese and South Asian Communities. NEW PROJECTS We are excited about the three new projects that were funded late in 2016. The CCEL continues to take a leadership role in exploring emerging and important issues affecting older adults. A brief description follows. Backgrounders and further details are available on our website. Investing with Supported Decision Making: Protecting the Rights of Vulnerable Investors The CCEL has received a grant from the Law Foundation of Ontario Access to Justice Fund for a two-year project on helping the investment sector embrace the potential of supported decision making for assisting people with intellectual disabilities to participate in investment decision making, and to assist those with declining cognitive abilities to continue to participate. This research project will engage investors from various communities in B.C. and Ontario, their supporters and stakeholders from the investment sector. The project builds on an earlier CCEL research study commissioned by the Law Commission of Ontario, which resulted in the first socio-legal


Jan Advocate 2017
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