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Sir Robert Borden. The mountains of the Premier Range, between the Fraser, Thompson, and Raush Rivers, were set aside in 1927 to be named after deceased prime ministers and other politicians, including the lawyers: Mount Sir Allan Macnab26 (2297 m), Mount Sir John Abbott (3398 m), Mount Sir John Thompson (3349 m), Mount Sir Wilfrid Laurier (3516 m) (the highest peak in the Cariboo Mountains), Mount Arthur Meighen (3205 m), Mount Richard Bennett (3190 m), Mount Louis Saint Laurent (3045 m), and Mount Pierre Elliott Trudeau (2650 m). Mount John Diefenbaker (2637 m) is located in another part of the nearby Cariboo Range. Assuming now that your interest has piqued (sorry!) be sure to watch these pages to find out about members of the bench and bar past and present who have scaled these and other heights when we publish “Part II – The Mountaineers” in a future edition of the Advocate. – Ed. ENDNOTES 60 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 1 J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE 1. Quintin Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone (1907–2001), QC, Lord Chancellor 1979–1987. In his youthful mountaineering, his ankles were broken so many times that in old age he required two canes to walk. 2. (1869–1956), KC, Permanent Secretary to the Lord Chancellor's Office 1915-1944, president of The Alpine Club from 1938 to 1940. Among his greatest accomplishments was his recommendation of Arthur Thompson Denning for appointment to the High Court in 1944. 3. (1828–1912), QC, judge of the High Court of England and Wales and the third president of The Alpine Club (1863–1865). 4. On which the lion statues at the south end of the Lions Gate Bridge are in turn modelled. 5. The authors acknowledge that many of the peaks mentioned herein have or had traditional First Nations names, recitation and research of which is beyond the scope of this article. 6. Sing v Maguire (1878), 1 BCR (Pt 1) at 104 (SC). 7. “In his Bench Book Begbie recorded the real facts of the episode. Begbie, realizing full well that Gray did not intend absconding but was going on holiday, heard in court the application for the arrest, or Capeas, to give the process its legal term, at 11:15 am, pointing out technical defects to the creditor’s lawyer. These remedied, the lawyer came before him again at 11:45 am, when Begbie pointed out another defect: that the process had been issued out of the County Court, not the Supreme Court, and hence Begbie said he could not issue the Order for arrest until the lawyer had established his jurisdiction. But in the margin of his Bench Book, he noted the steamer was to depart at 12 noon, which it did, and revealed a further reason for temporizing by adding: ‘No personal process against a Judge of Supreme Court.’ This was not an enunciation of a new principle of law, but a determination by Begbie that no member of his court was going to be arrested, if he could prevent it. Gray did return from his holiday, and no doubt had ultimately to settle the debt.” David R Williams,“… The Man for a New Country”: Sir Matthew Baillie Begbie (Sidney, BC: Gray’s Publishing, 1977) at 163–64. 8. There appears to be no peak, on Graham Island or otherwise, named for Gray J, although most early colonial judges are so honoured (see below). Nor is Justice A R Robertson (1880–1881) so honoured. The Hon John Foster McCreight, QC, first premier of British Columbia and Supreme Court judge (1880–1897) was similarly overlooked in the mountain department, although he has an island, point, lake, and rock named for him. 9. Mountains named after a person are usually called “Mount X”, while those named after a thing are “X Mountain”. Thus a “Crown Mountain” might be named due to its shape, but a “Mount Crown” after Mr. Crown. Mount Bishop, north of Mount Seymour, is named for Joseph Bishop, the first president of the British Columbia Mountaineering Club, who died falling into a crevasse on Mount Baker. Mount Bishop might thus be said to have a heavenly connotation, but not an episcopal one. 10. Williams, supra note 7 at 158–59. 11. Ibid at 162–63. 12. To the west, Cameron Peak (377 m) and the Cameron Range may have been named for David Cameron (1804 Perthshire, Scotland–1872 Victoria), first Chief Justice of the Colony of Vancouver Island (1853–1865). It first appeared on an 1856 admiralty chart: CGDNB entry: "… as labeled on British Admiralty Chart 2168 (1856).” Online: <http://apps.gov.bc.ca/pub/bcgnws/names/ 29031.html> accessed 26 July 2016. 13. McBride Peak was not directly named after the premier; instead, it was named after the nearby town of McBride, which was named after the premier.


Jan Advocate 2017
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