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58 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 1 J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE throughout the Fraser Valley. The northeast face of Mount Robie Reid is 1700 metres high: likely the tallest rock wall in southwest British Columbia. Although within 100 kilometres of Vancouver, Mount Judge Howay is an arduous adventure, requiring a boat trip, a ten-kilometre hike, a vertical bushwhack, and a technical climb to the twin black craggy peaks. These peaks commemorate the historians, law partners, and friends William Frederick Howay (1867 London, Ontario–1943 New Westminster) and Robie Lewis Reid (1866 Cornwallis, Nova Scotia–1945 Vancouver).19 Howay and Reid moved to British Columbia from Nova Scotia and Ontario, respectively, and became teachers. Reid then convinced Howay to return to Dalhousie University with him to study law. They graduated in 1890, and in 1893 returned to British Columbia, forming the law firm of Howay & Reid in New Westminster. In 1907 Howay was appointed a judge of the County Court, serving until 1937. Around this time, he changed the spelling of his name from “Howie” to “Howay”. Despite his legal accomplishments, Howay was better known as a historian of British Columbia, writing a complete four-volume history of the province, as well as histories of Captain James Colnett, the Dixon-Meares controversy, shipping in Burrard Inlet, and Fraser River mining.20 Reid was also an enthusiastic historian and supporter of the University of British Columbia, serving on its board of governors from 1913 to 1935. He was a bencher of the Law Society from 1927 to 1943. Reid donated to UBC the Howay-Reid Collection;21 these thousands of books, pamphlets, and maps formed the largest collection of Canadiana assembled to that date. Mount Duff (2198 m), located on the Alaska border, is named after Chief Justice Lyman Poore Duff (1865 Meaford, Ontario–1955 Ottawa), the first British Columbian and the second-longest serving Chief Justice of Canada. In 1895 Duff moved from Fergus, Ontario to set up practice in Victoria. The location of his peak is appropriate, given that in 1903 Duff served as junior counsel for Canada before the Alaskan Boundary Commission in London, England. Other nearby border peaks are named after the Canadian and British members of the arbitration panel convened to settle that dispute: Mount Jetté (2558 m) after Sir Louis A. Jetté (1836 L’Assomption, Quebec– 1920 Quebec City), Lieutenant Governor of Quebec and former Chief Justice of the Court of King’s Bench in Quebec; Mount Alverstone (4420 m) after Lord Chief Justice Baron Alverstone (1842 Holborn, London–1915 Cranleigh, Surrey); Mount Armour (2674 m) after Chief Justice John Douglas Armour (1830 Otonabee, Ontario–1903 London, UK), Chief Justice of the High Court of Ontario, and Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada; and Mount Aylesworth (2830 m) after Sir Allen B. Aylesworth, K.C. (1854 Cam-


Jan Advocate 2017
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