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Jan Advocate 2017

THE ADVOCATE V O L . 7 5 P A R T 1 J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 7 57 1883 and served as a justice of the Supreme Court of British Columbia from 1889 to 1904.12 In addition to Davie, two other British Columbia lawyer–premiers are commemorated in British Columbia mountains (and hills). Walkem Cone (also called Melbourne Hill) (253 m) on Broughton Island, to the northeast of Port McNeill, is named after Justice George Anthony Walkem (1834 Newry, Northern Ireland–1908 Victoria), who served as premier from 1874 to 1876 and 1878 to 1882, and as a Supreme Court justice from 1882 to 1908. Lawyer and Premier Richard ‘Dick’ McBride (1870 New Westminster–1917 London) (premier from 1903 to 1915), the first premier born in British Columbia, has no fewer than three mountains named after him: Mount McBride (2083 m) in Strathcona Park, Mount Sir Richard (2681 m) in the McBride Range of Garibaldi Park, and McBride Peak (2284 m) near the town of McBride.13 Mount Brew (2891 m), south of Lillooet, was named after Judge Chartres Brew (1815 Corofin, Ireland–1870 Richfield), a Crimean War veteran who was appointed Chief of Police in the province and then Chief Magistrate at New Westminster. After the so-called Chilcotin Uprising in 1864, led by the Chilcotin Chief Klatsassin, in which some 18 settlers, workmen, and others of European descent were killed,14 Governor Frederick Seymour sent Brew on two search expeditions to the Chilcotins, traveling over and extensively searching the mountainous territory in the area.15 In 1867 Brew was made Chief Gold Commissioner, and then a County Court judge at Barkerville, where he is buried in the old hillside cemetery.16 Lawyers Pass, east of Spatsizi Plateau Wilderness Provincial Park, commemorates a murder trial and unsolved mystery that attracted national attention.17 Simon Gunanoot (1878 Kispiox Valley–1933 near Stewart, B.C.), a Gitxsan merchant in the Kispiox Valley near Hazelton, was accused of the 1906 murder of two men with whom witnesses say he had recently been in an argument. Gunanoot disappeared with his family. He eluded posses, police, and the Pinkerton detective agency for 13 years. At last, in 1919, he turned himself in to the authorities. Stuart Alexander Henderson (1863 Aberdeenshire–1945 Victoria), one of the best criminal defense lawyers in British Columbia at the time, successfully defended Gunanoot, arguing that the evidence was purely circumstantial. After the verdict, Gunanoot led Henderson on a prospecting trip from Bulkley House to Toodoggone River, via said mountain pass.18 The true killer was never found. The dramatic peaks of Mount Judge Howay (2262 m) and Mount Robie Reid (2095 m) in Golden Ears Provincial Park are readily seen from the North Shore mountains and JUDGE HOWAY


Jan Advocate 2017
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