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9. Arbitration Act, RSBC 1996, c 55, s 35 (formerly the Commercial Arbitration Act, RSBC 1996, c 55). 10. Arbitration Act, RSA 2000, c A-43, s 44. 11. In adopting this exception, Alberta is the only province to have adopted that provision of the previous UAA. 12. Arbitration Act, CCSM c A120, s 44. 13. Arbitration Act, 1991, SO 1991, c 17, ss 3, 45–46. 14. Arbitration Act, 1992, SS 1992, c A-24.1, ss 4, 45– 46. 15. Arbitration Act, RSNL 1990, c A-14, s 36. 16. Commercial Arbitration Act, SNS 1999, c 5, s 48. 17. Arbitration Act, RSPEI 1988, c A-16, s 21. 18. Arbitration Act, RSNWT 1988, c A-5, ss 26–28; Arbitration Act, RSY 2002, c 8, ss 25–27; Arbitration Act, RSNWT (Nu) 1998, c A-5, ss 26–28. 19. It is interesting to note that, on the question of appeals, the approach adopted by Nova Scotia and PEI is closest to the approach recommended in the new UAA. That approach also happens to represent the approach that applied in Ontario prior to the adoption by Ontario of the previous UAA in 1991. See legislative history described in LIUNA, Local 183 v Carpenters & Allied Workers, Local 27 (1997), 101 OAC 230 at paras 12–13. 20. The text is subject to some further non-substantive, editorial revision by the ULCC before it is published on the ULCC website. 21. All of the following examples are taken from British Columbia. The reason for this is that the number and regularity of such cases from that province provide an excellent source of examples, with all examples sharing a common legislative foundation and many examples forming the basis of the most significant Supreme Court of Canada jurisprudence on the subject. 22. Boxer Capital Corp v JEL Investments Ltd, 2009 BCSC 1294. 23. JEL Investments Ltd v Boxer Capital Corp, 2010 BCSC 947. 24. JEL Investments Ltd v Boxer Capital Corp, 2011 BCCA 142. 25. JEL Investments Ltd v Boxer Capital Corp, 2011 BCSC 1526. 26. Boxer Capital Corp v JEL Investments Ltd, 2013 BCSC 678. 27. Boxer Capital Corp v JEL Investments Ltd, 2013 BCCA 297. 28. Boxer Capital Corp v JEL Investments Ltd, 2013 BCSC 2366. 29. Boxer Capital Corp v JEL Investments Ltd, 2015 BCCA 24. 30. Creston Moly Corp v Sattva Capital Corp, 2009 BCSC 1079. 31. Creston Moly Corp v Sattva Capital Corp, 2010 BCCA 239. 32. Creston Moly Corp v Sattva Capital Corp, 2011 BCSC 597. 33. Creston Moly Corp v Sattva Capital Corp, 2012 BCCA 329. 34. Creston Moly Corp v Sattva Capital Corp, 2013 CarswellBC 558 (WL Can) (SCC). 35. Sattva Capital Corp v Creston Moly Corp, 2014 SCC 53. 36. See Desputeaux v Éditions Chouette (1987) inc, 2003 SCC 17. 37. See Urban Communications Inc v BCNET Networking Society, 2014 BCSC 485 at paras 21, 26. 38. Ibid. 39. Urban Communications Inc v BCNET Networking Society, 2014 BCSC 1045. 40. Urban Communications Inc v BCNET Networking Society, 2015 BCCA 297. 41. Urban Communications Inc v BCNET Networking Society, 2016 CarswellBC 385 (WL Can) (SCC). 42. Urban Communications Inc v BCNET Networking Society, 2016 SCC 45. 43. British Columbia (Ministry of Forests) v Teal Cedar Products Ltd, 2012 BCSC 543. 44. British Columbia (Ministry of Forests) v Teal Cedar Products Ltd, 2013 BCCA 326. 45. British Columbia v Teal Cedar Products Ltd, 2013 CarswellBC 3274 (SCC). 46. British Columbia v Teal Cedar Products Ltd, 2015 BCCA 263. 47. British Columbia v Teal Cedar Products Ltd, 2015 CarswellBC 4074 (SCC). 48. For a fuller explanation see William G Horton, “Arbitration at the Crossroads: The Supreme Court of Canada Will Choose the Way”, The Lawyers Weekly (28 October 2016). 49. Supra note 46 at para 59. 50. Demosthenes, “Against Meidias” in Demosthenes, Against Meidias, Androtion, Aristocrates, Timocrates, Aristogeiton (1935) 69 at 94 emphasis added, quoted in Gary B Born, International Commercial Arbitration, 2nd ed (Kluwer Law International, 2014) at 10–11. 51. Pupuke Service Station Ltd v Caltex Oil (NZ) Ltd, 2000 3 NZLR 338 at para 1 (PC). 52. Jan Paulsson, The Idea of Arbitration (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013) at 1. 53. For an excellent exposition of the additional issues that must be dealt with on an arbitration appeal that do not arise in an appeal from a trial judgment see John Hunter, “Appellate Review of Commercial Arbitration Awards: Should Appellate Review Override Party Autonomy?” in Todd L Archibald & Randall Scott Echlin, eds, Annual Review of Civil Litigation 2016 (Toronto: Carswell). 54. It can be, and has been, argued that this is an important aspect of commercial freedom. Where different considerations apply (as in family, labour or consumer disputes) restrictions on the right to arbitrate and the binding effect of arbitration may be appropriate. 50 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 1 J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE t t t t t


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