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• Support opportunities for Aboriginal lawyers to advance within the legal profession and legal institutions. Supporting the Development of Aboriginal–Owned Businesses • Prefer Aboriginal businesses and suppliers where available. • Host firm events in Aboriginal centres and businesses. • Support local Aboriginal artists and galleries by choosing and displaying their work in law firm offices. Law firms or individual lawyers could commit to taking any (or all) of the above actions to contribute to reconciliation in Canada through a RAP, or simply as a personal commitment statement. In addition to setting out specific initiatives and targets, RAPs are usually implemented and monitored through a RAP committee, which reports annually on whether or not the RAP initiatives are being achieved and proposes new initiatives for the following year to continue to deepen the firm’s reconciliation commitments. MOVING FROM TRUTH TO RECONCILIATION The TRC calls on all Canadians to rise to the challenge of reconciliation. The legal profession has a special obligation to advance reconciliation. The above suggestions are just a beginning, and despite the strength of their statement, are not meant to be prescriptive. Instead, they are intended to support the legal profession in British Columbia in beginning the hard work of moving from truth to reconciliation and to ensure that we take time to understand the experience of Aboriginal peoples in Canada and set a course that will best build a just and fair future. ENDNOTES 28 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 1 J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE 1. The Tr uth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, Honouring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future: Summary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (2015) at 21. 2. Ibid at 1. 3. Chief Justice of Canada Beverley McLachlin, “Reconciling Unity and Diversity in the Modern Era: Tolerance and Intolerance” (Annual Pluralism Lecture delivered at the Aga Khan Museum, Global Centre for Pluralism, Toronto, 28 May 2015) unpublished. 4. For example, the Federation of Law Societies sponsored a conference in Winnipeg in October 2015. Law school professors Gillian Calder and Rebecca Johnson started a shared blog (Reconciliation Syllabus: a TRC-Inspired gathering of materials for teaching law, online: <http://reconciliationsyllabus. wordpress.com>). Many law deans have written extensively on transforming legal education. See Lorne Sossin, “The TRC Calls to Action & the Pursuit of Reconciliation” (18 October 2015), online: <http: //deansblog.osgoode.yorku.ca/2015/10/the-trccalls to-action-the-pursuit-of-reconciliation/>; Jeremy Webber, “The Law Schools and the Future of Indigenous Law in Canada” (14 August 2015), online: <http://www.slaw.ca/2015/ 08/04/thelaw schools-and-the-future-of-indigenous-law-incanada/>. 5. For more about the program offered by Reconciliation Australia see its website: http://www.reconciliation. org.au/raphub/about/. More information about the impact of implementing RAPs can be found online: <https://www.reconciliation.org.au/ wp-content/uploads/2016/02/RAP-Impact- Measurement-Report-2015. pdf>. 6. Some of these are drawn from the RAP adopted by the author’s firm, JFK Law Corporation. The entire RAP can be found online: <http://www.jfklaw. ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Reconciliation- Action-Plan-1.pdf>.


Jan Advocate 2017
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