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Jan Advocate 2017

THE ADVOCATE V O L . 7 5 P A R T 1 J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 7 151 Sandra L. Case was reappointed as a member of the board of Kwantlen Polytechnic University for a term ending December 31, 2018. Bonnie M. Leonard was reappointed as a member of the board of Thompson Rivers University for a term ending December 31, 2018. In 2003 the B.C. Court of Appeal examined the application of the Kienapple principle in a case where the accused was convicted of unlawfully importing into Canada from Papua New Guinea six birdwing butterflies of the genus Ornithoptera: R. v. Deslisle, 2003 BCCA 196. George Heinmiller has retired from practice after a varied 42+ year career, which started with articles in 1974–75 at Davis & Company (now DLA Piper) and onward moves to Macrae Montgomery (now Bernard LLP among others) as an associate, the federal Department of Justice as civil litigation counsel, the Canadian Pacific Limited legal department as in-house counsel, Canadian Pacific Air Lines, Limited as general counsel & corporate secretary, Edwards, Kenny & Bray as an associate, the National Transportation Act and Canadian Transportation Safety Board Act Review Commissions as Commission counsel, the Vancouver Stock Exchange (now the TSX Venture Exchange) as in-house counsel and, for the last 15 years, Teekay Corporation as associate general counsel. There is no truth to the rumour that Mr. Heinmiller—also a veteran of the inaugural UBC Law School trike race—is planning to publish a glossy coffee table book entitled Vancouver + Ottawa Office Buildings I Have Worked In. The Tauranga, New Zealand courthouse has a court dog. The dog has proven to be a success in supporting young victims and witnesses through the stress of appearing in court. Louie is a black Labrador of docile disposition, who has had unexpected success with his positive impact on court staff and lawyers. He was originally introduced to two girls who were going to have to give evidence against their father. When the girls came to court for a pre-trial visit, counsel realized they were not going to be good witnesses; they were too distraught. They were introduced to Louie, who kept them busy feeding him treats and taking him for a walk. It worked. They did not simply sit there and fret while they waited. Court dogs have existed in some states in the U.S. since 2003. This was the year that Jeeter, a golden Labrador, made his first appearance by accompanying twin sisters into a courtroom after they refused to testify without his presence. The trend caught on and “courthouse facility dogs” now exist in 26 states. The nonprofit Courthouse Dogs Foundation provides technical assistance, accredi-


Jan Advocate 2017
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