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Jan Advocate 2017

150 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 1 J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE in Dawson Creek and Prince Rupert. Beginning March 1991 Peter worked as a sole practitioner in Nanaimo. Peter has been an inspiration to all members of the Nanaimo legal profession, making tireless efforts to serve others first, often without any remuneration. He is also multi-talented and known to break into song when celebrating momentous occasions, including singing, unconventionally, the Welsh national anthem for the Provincial Court’s Judge Brian Harvey at his welcome ceremony in 2016. Andrew R.T. Pendray was appointed as a member and chair of the Workers’ Compensation Appeal Tribunal for a term of three years. David J.P. Wells was appointed as a member of the Council of the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of the Province of British Columbia for a term of two years. Moths belong to the order Lepidoptera just as butterflies do. “As a moth is drawn to the light, so is a litigant drawn to the United States,” noted Lord Denning M.R., adding that “if the litigant can only get his case into their courts, he stands to win a fortune”, at no cost to himself (given contingency fees and no costs payable to the opposing party). Lord Denning also cited, as reasons for the attraction of the United States as a forum for litigation, that it had juries “prone to award fabulous damages” and the fact that “the defendant can be readily forced into a settlement. The plaintiff holds all the cards”: Smith Kline & French Laboratories Ltd v. Bloch, 1983 2 All ER 72 (C.A.). The State of Ohio is moving its death row for the third time in a decade, this time because of the growing number of inmates serving death sentences. Ohio has 126 inhabitants on death row, aged 21 to 75. Ohio has had an unofficial moratorium on executions for the last three years due to a shortage of lethal drugs. The state plans to resume executions in January 2017. Ohio reenacted the death penalty in 1981. Well, one can only shake one’s head. Thirty-one of the states and the U.S. federal government still retain the death penalty. New Zealand is in the process of amending its Maritime Crimes Act to implement its obligations under two maritime counter-terrorism treaties. The New Zealand Law Society made a presentation to the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Select Committee in an attempt to ensure that peaceful protest is not inadvertently classified as terrorism.


Jan Advocate 2017
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