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Jan Advocate 2017

148 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 1 J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE 9762 For the moment, in the words of Ovid (with an embellishment from the old Latin Mass): Iamque opus exegi, Deo gratias And now I have finished the work, thanks be to God. Each of Daphne E. Stancil, Robert V. Wickett, Q.C., David H. Searle, Q.C., and Norman E. Yates were appointed to the Environmental Appeal Board, the Forest Appeals Commission and the Oil and Gas Appeal Tribunal for terms ending December 31, 2017. Mr. Wickett was designated the vice chair of the Environmental Appeal Board and the Forest Appeals Commission while Mr. Searle was designated vice chair of the Oil and Gas Appeal Tribunal. Del Elgersma was reappointed as a member of the Central Saanich Police Board for a term ending December 13, 2017. John Luther Long, a Philadelphia lawyer, wrote the short story “Madame Butterfly”, which was published in Century Illustrated Magazine in 1898. His story formed the basis for a play that became the basis for Giacomo Puccini’s opera “Madama Butterfly”, which premiered at La Scala in February 1904. The Supreme Court of the United States is limping along short one member because the Republicans in the Senate refuse to hold a confirmation hearing of the president’s nominee, Merrick Garland. The Republicans have shut down the nomination process out of concern that the near half-century of conservative control of the court may come to an end. The court has split 4–4 several times in the last session, with the result that the decisions appealed stand as the law. The court starts each session on the first Monday of October and runs for about a year, with time off in the summer. This session’s docket includes a challenge to the secrecy of jury deliberations when there is evidence that a juror was racially biased against an accused, the State of Texas’ unscientific standard for determining if someone is intellectually disabled enough to be spared from execution, a 28-state lawsuit against President Obama’s effort to reduce pollution from coal-fired power plants, and cases on immigration, birth control access and public sector union dues levied upon non-members (a case left undecided last session because the justices split 4–4). The U.S. Supreme Court ruled, late in its last term, that the State of Georgia had violated the U.S. Constitution by striking two jurors on the basis of race in a capital murder case. “Two peremptory strikes on the basis of race are


Jan Advocate 2017
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