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Jan Advocate 2017

146 V O L . 7 5 P A R T 1 J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 7 THE ADVOCATE The Texas Butterfly Ranch asks on its website: “What will happen to pollinator advocacy under President Trump?” It notes: There’s no doubt that much of the advocacy, progress and attention to Monarch butterflies and other pollinators in the last two years has directly resulted from President Obama’s focus. He will surely go down in history, among the growing community of committed pollinator advocates, as “the pollinator president.” … And what will happen to these programs under a Trump Administration? “The short answer is … it’s just too early to tell,” said Susan Kaderka, Southwest regional director of the National Wildlife Federation. “The Monarch work has been very popular—with states in the flyway, including many that went for Trump, with major cities and towns large and small. So it may be that it will continue, though I am sure USF&W is spending some money on it and it is unclear what will happen to that.” Monarch butterfly and pollinator advocates inside government and out echoed feelings of doubt and bewilderment. Most did not want their names attached to their quotes. Several suggested that programs and initiatives might be safe for a while, as the new Trump administration focuses its attention elsewhere in the early days. A call for more reliance on private sector funding and pulling together for the long haul were common themes. David L. Sterns, president of the Ontario Bar Association, wrote to the Ontario Judicial Council on November 16, 2016 expressing the OBA’s concerns about suggestions of a judge walking into a courtroom the day after the U.S. federal election allegedly wearing a red baseball cap with the words “Make America Great Again” embroidered on it. Mr. Sterns wrote: I write on behalf of the Ontario Bar Association to express our serious concerns about the recent conduct of Justice Bernd Zabel of the Ontario Court of Justice. I refer to his decision to wear into his courtroom a hat associated with the campaign of Donald Trump in the recent U.S. presidential election. As Justice Zabel has now confirmed, he wore the hat into court on the day after the election, and then placed the hat on the dais while hearing cases that came before him. In the view of our association, this conduct gives rise to two separate but equally serious concerns. Our first concern is with the open display of political apparel by a judge while carrying out judicial duties. Needless to say, it is completely inappropriate for any judicial officer to wear or display any political apparel while presiding in a court of law. This action violates the tradition of judicial independence and neutrality that is a cornerstone of our justice system. Our concern in this regard applies regardless of what political views are being displayed and regardless of what the motivations are for displaying them. Judicial officers must be and must be seen to be politically neutral in carrying out their duties.


Jan Advocate 2017
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